OPERATION STORM: ENDING HUMANITARIAN DISASTER AND GENOCIDE IN SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE

DOROTHY S. MCCLELLAN, NIKOLA KNEZ

Abstract:

Operation Storm was the single-most decisive battle of the Croatian War for Independence (1991-1995). Launched by the Republic of Croatia in August 1995, it was the largest European land battle since the Second World War. Outnumbered, outgunned, but not outmaneuvered, this tiny new democracy prevailed in a David versus Goliath encounter, a moral as well as military victory. Storm ended a massive humanitarian disaster and genocide. It led to the liberation of one third of Croatian territory, and made possible the Dayton Agreement that brought peace to the region. Based on interviews conducted with the American Ambassador to Croatia during the war years, military and political principals in the battle, noted scholars, security and intelligence agency officials, humanitarian leaders and journalists, this social scientific qualitative study examines the political and historical origins of the war and its aftermath. The article documents the events leading up to the war and surrounding this extraordinary military operation, providing strategic and political insights into the need for cooperation between democratic allies.

Keywords:
war, humanitarian disaster, genocide, Yugoslavia, Croatian War for Independence, Balkans, democracy, human rights, rights, Greater Serbia, Ambassador Peter Galbraith, Hague Tribunal, Operation Storm

DOI: 10.52950/SS2021.10.1.003

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APA citation:
DOROTHY S. MCCLELLAN, NIKOLA KNEZ (2021). Operation Storm: Ending Humanitarian Disaster and Genocide in Southeastern Europe. International Journal of Social Sciences, Vol. X(1), pp. 39-73. , DOI: 10.52950/SS2021.10.1.003


Copyright © 2021, Dorothy S. McClellan et al, dorothy.mcclellan@tamucc.edu